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Soda and Illegal Drugs Cause Similar Damage to Teeth: Acids Erode Enamel

Soda and Illegal Drugs Cause Similar Damage to Teeth: Acids Erode Enamel Addicted to soda? You may be shocked to learn that drinking large quantities of your favorite carbonated soda could be as damaging to your teeth as methamphetamine and crack cocaine use. The consumption of illegal drugs and abusive intake of soda can cause similar damage to your mouth through the process of tooth erosion, according to a case study published in the March/April 2013 issue of General Dentistry. Tooth erosion occurs when acid wears away tooth enamel, which is the glossy, protective outside layer of the tooth. Without the protection of enamel, teeth are more susceptible to developing cavities, as well as becoming sensitive, cracked, and discolored. The General Dentistry case study compared the damage in three individuals’ mouths — an admitted user of methamphetamine, a previous longtime user of cocaine, and an excessive diet soda drinker. Each participant admitted to having poor oral hygiene and not visiting a dentist on a regular basis. Researchers found the same type and severity of damage from tooth erosion in each participant’s mouth. “Each person experienced severe tooth erosion caused by the high acid levels present in their ‘drug’ of choice — meth, crack, or soda,” says Mohamed A. Bassiouny, DMD, MSc, PhD, lead author of the study. “The citric acid present in both regular and diet soda is known to have a high potential for causing tooth erosion,” says Dr. Bassiouny. Similar to citric acid, the ingredients used in preparing methamphetamine can include extremely corrosive materials, such as battery acid, lantern fuel, and drain cleaner. Crack cocaine is highly acidic in nature,...

Dental Health Week

It’s Dental Health Week this week and a great reminder for some of us that we may need to book in for a check-up. Our pearly whites are precious and we want to hold on to them for as long as we can.   The ADA has some great information on all things teeth on their website for Dental Health Week 2013. A great guide for everyone. There are some fantastic resources  for Adults, Parents and Teachers – some dental education for all age group. They have included the young person’s guide to oral health. Something all parents should have their teenagers read. Get all the facts and download the guide below. http://www.dentalhealthweek.com.au/downloads/survival_guide_web.pdf Visit the ADA website At Lasting Impressions Dental we want to make sure you are giving your teeth the best care possible. We hope reading this blog post and reading the young person’s survival guide has provided you with some interesting and useful information for keeping your pearl whites in check. If you’re due to make your dental check-up appointment please ph us on 6249 8383 to make an appointment with either Dr Davies or Dr Edmond Truong. Happy Dental Health...

Dental Research: Gingival Stem Cells Can Be Used in Tissue Regeneration

July 18, 2013 — Gingivae represent a unique soft tissue that serves as a biological barrier to cover the oral cavity side of the maxilla and mandible. Recently, the gingivae were identified as containing mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs). However, it is unknown whether the GMSCs are derived from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC) or the mesoderm. Today, the International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) published a paper titled “Gingivae Contain Neural-crest- and Mesoderm-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.” The paper, written by lead author Songtao Shi, Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology, Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA, is published in the OnlineFirst portion of the IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research. In this study, Shi and his team of researchers demonstrated that around 90 percent of GMSCs are derived from CNCC and 10 percent from the mesoderm. In comparison with mesoderm MSCs (M-GMSCs), CNCC-derived GMSCs (N-GMSCs) show an elevated capacity to differentiate into neural cells and chondrocytes as well as to modulate immune cells. When transplanted into mice with dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, N-GMSCs showed superior effects in ameliorating inflammatory-related disease phenotype in comparison with the M-GMSC treatment group. Further research is required to understand the interaction between the neural crest cell derived and mesoderm derived gingivae mesenchymal stem cells (N-GMSCs and M-GMSCs) in terms of their functional roles in gingival immune defense and wound healing. “The tooth and surrounding tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and this JDR manuscript demonstrates that gingivae contain highly proliferative stem cells from two different embryonic origins and that these cells exhibit distinct behaviors,” said JDR Associate Editor Jacques...

Help Save Lives

Help Save Lives Did you know that 1 in every 3 people will need blood donation at some point in their lives? I didn’t realise the need  was so high until I heard an interview yesterday with a representative from the Blood Bank. She also said that although 1 in 3 people will need blood only about 1 in 30 people make donations. You don’t need to be a genius to work out there is a serious shortfall.  You also never know when you might need blood. And as this is National Blood Donor Week there has never been a better time to start! So why not join the Lasting Impressions Team in supporting this essential service! Follow the link below to find out more and to read the story of three kids who rely on regular donations of blood just to do the things we take for granted....

Fossil Kangaroo Teeth Reveal Mosaic of Pliocene Ecosystems in Queensland

 The teeth of a kangaroo and other extinct marsupials reveal that southeastern Queensland 2.5-5-million-years ago was a mosaic of tropical forests, wetlands and grasslands and much less arid than previously thought. The chemical analysis of tooth enamel that suggests this diverse prehistoric habitat is published June 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Shaena Montanari from the American Museum of Natural History and colleagues from other institutions. The carbon isotope ratios present in these fossil teeth revealed that the extinct kangaroo ate plants similar to those consumed by present-day kangaroos in temperate and tropical regions, rather than the plants that now grow in this region. The fossils examined also suggest that different animals in the area occupied specialized dietary niches and did not rely on identical sources of food. As the authors explain, “This period, the Pliocene, is critical to understand the origins and evolution of Australia’s unique modern animals. It is during this time that the Australian fauna first began to take on its modern appearance and distinctiveness, with many modern Australian marsupials, such as the agile wallaby Macropus gracilis, first appearing in Pliocene fossil deposits.” Montanari adds, “It is vital for us to understand what types of environments Australian megafauna thrived in during the Pliocene. Obtaining detailed environmental records from this time can help us find the drivers of the subsequent extinctions of many of these large marsupials.”...

Interesting Dental Facts Part 1

 INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT DENTISTS & DENTISTRY Dental health is quite intriguing. There are plenty of myths around that we blindly believe and follow. Dental health is a whole science in itself and there is a lot more to it than appears so. Here are some interesting facts that an average person does not know about dental health. *The commonly used practice of putting a cap on toothbrush is actually more detrimental.The moisture entrapped in the cap favors bacterial growth. *You are not supposed to brush within 6 feet of a toilet. The airborne particles from the flush can travel up toa distance of 6 feet. *People who tend to drink 3 or more glasses of soda/pop daily have 62% more tooth decay, fillings and toothloss than others. *The first toothbrush with bristles was manufactured in China in 1498. Bristles from hogs, horses and badgerswere used. The first commercial toothbrush was made in 1938. *Fluoridated toothpastes when ingested habitually by kids can lead to fluoride toxicity.You are supposed to replace your toothbrush after you have an episode of flu, cold or other viral infections. *Notorious microbes can implant themselves on the toothbrush bristles leading to re-infection.New born babies do not have tooth decay bacteria. *Often, the bacteria are transmitted from mother to babywhen she kisses the child or blows in hot food/drink before feeding the baby We hope you enjoyed these interesting Dental facts!...

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